On-Site and Off-Site Clinical Services


Speech and Language Services

The Center for Communication Sciences & Disorders provides comprehensive diagnostic and therapy services for a wide range of communication disorders across all age groups. Areas evaluated and treated at the Center include:

  • Child language delays/disorders
  • Speech/Articulation disorders due to developmental or acquired conditions
  • Apraxia of Speech
  • Language including the impact of hearing loss
  • Autism Spectrum Disorder
  • Stuttering
  • Voice disorders
  • Language and cognitive impairments following stroke, traumatic brain injury and/or disease including ALS, Parkinson's, and Alzheimer's/Dementia
  • Accent modification for English Language learners and language differences
  • Augmentative/Alternative Communication
  • Feeding and swallowing disorders
  • Voice Banking for clients with degenerative diseases including ALS
  • Social Skills Groups

Following a diagnostic evaluation, a treatment plan is developed to meet the individual's needs. Individuals are scheduled for therapy and all speech-language services are supervised by licensed speech-language pathologists.


Brain Injury Clinic

Provides evaluation and intervention services for adults with language and cognitive difficulties (including thinking abilities, self-regulation, coaching strategies and executive functioning due to brain injury), aphasia, primary progressive aphasia, traumatic brain injury, dementia, Parkinson' and other neurological progressive disorders.


Dementia-Friendly Meaningful EngAGEment

Provides patient-centered services for individuals with dementia and real-world learning experiences for our students to work with individuals with dementia

Memory Book Program (off campus)

Students have opportunities to become dementia friends and provide person-centered services to individuals with dementia.

Students with Memory Book Program participant

Students with Memory Book Program participant

Garden EngAGEnt Program (off campus)

Addressing the impact of stigma and social isolation for individuals living with Alzheimer' disease or other associated dementias is imperative. This interdisciplinary project aims to provide a socially-focused gardening program that includes those living with the disease, care partners, youth and friends and offers interprofessional collaboration for University faculty and students.

Garden EngAGEnt Program participants working in garden

Garden EngAGEnt Program participants working in garden

Who do I contact for more information?

Garden EngAGEnt Program participants working in gardenH. Sheen Chiou, Ph.D. CCC-SLP is a professor in Speech, Hearing and Rehabilitation Services. Dr. Chiou is a bilingual speech-language pathologist and provides assessment and intervention services for individuals with brain injury (e.g., stroke, traumatic brain injury, neurodegenerative disorders). She has been a clinical instructor at Minnesota State University, Mankato since 2010. Dr. Chiou' expertise is adult language and cognitive disorders, and she has created several community-based dementia programs and co-founded Garden EngAGEment through interprofessional collaboration.

Contact information:
Email: hsinhuei.chiou@mnsu.edu
Phone: 507-389-5840
Office: Clinical Sciences Building room 321

Dementia-Friendly Meaningful Engagement Program


Concussion Training (off campus)

Provides an interactive, hands-on way to understand the signs and effects of concussion and explore the human brain functions and learn traumatic brain injury protocols.

Concussion training participants

Concussion training participants

Who do I contact for more information?

Concussion training participantsH. Sheen Chiou, Ph.D. CCC-SLP is a professor in Speech, Hearing and Rehabilitation Services. Dr. Chiou' expertise is adult language and cognitive disorders. Dr. Chiou is a bilingual speech-language pathologist and provides assessment and intervention services for individuals with brain injury (e.g., stroke, traumatic brain injury, neurodegenerative disorders). Dr. Chiou created community-based dementia programs and co-founded Garden EngAGEment through interprofessional collaboration.

Contact information:
Email: hsinhuei.chiou@mnsu.edu
Phone: 507-389-5840
Office: Clinical Sciences Building room 321

Concussion Training Program


Child Language Delays/Disorders and Speech Sound Delays/Disorders

Children of all ages may exhibit child language delays and/or disorders, resulting in small vocabularies, difficulty forming grammatical sentences, and/or difficulty communicating in a social environment. They may also exhibit speech sound delays/disorders, which include the use of the sound system of language and articulation. Children who have language delays and/or speech sound delays are delayed in the normal development of communication abilities. Child language disorders and speech sound disorders may be the result of apraxia, autism, Down Syndrome, hearing impairment, Williams Syndrome, Moebius Syndrome, Fragile X Syndrome, to name a few.


Voice Banking

Children and adults who have certain disorders, such as ALS, may lose their ability to communicate verbally over time. Through voice banking services, recordings of an individual' speech are made, and a synthesized voice is created from the recordings. The synthesized voice can be programmed into an augmentative and alternative communication device.

Who do I contact for more information?

Bonnie Berg, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is a professor in the Department of Speech, Hearing and Rehabilitation Services. Dr. Berg' expertise is child language delays/disorders, speech sound/delays disorders, and voice banking. Dr. Berg provides assessment and intervention services for children and adults exhibiting developmental language and speech sound delays. Additionally, she provides services for children exhibiting language disorders and speech sound disorders.


Literacy and Learning Diagnostic Clinic

Student and participant in Literacy and Learning Diagnostic ClinicProvides assessment and intervention services for children and adults with reading and writing or other academic difficulties, including dyslexia, disorders of executive functioning and language-related learning difficulties.

All assessments are completed either by a speech-language pathologist or by a trained graduate student clinician under the direct supervision of a speech-language pathologist.

As a speech-language pathologist, the following can be diagnosed:

  • Language Disorder/Delay
  • Reading Disorder (including Dyslexia)
  • Writing Disorder
  • Disorders of Executive Functioning (attention, memory, planning and executing tasks)

Learning Disorders, Autism, Attention Deficit/Hyperactive Disorders cannot be diagnosed by a speech-language pathologist. Appropriate referrals will be made for those diagnoses.

All testing is completed in 2 two-hour sessions (4 hours). After these sessions, a written report with disability information will be compiled as well as a face-to-face or phone consolation regarding results will be available. This report can be used for 504 planning in schools and accommodations/modification for college courses.

The results will be reported using International Classification of Disorders -10 (ICD-10) coding for disability which is also accepted by Accessibility Resources at Minnesota State University, Mankato and local school districts for 504 plans.

Cost of Assessment

The cost of the assessment is $400 which includes up to 4 hours of face-to-face assessment, a written report and consultation regarding results. Sliding scale or reduced fees are available upon request.

Payment can be made at any point during the assessment process by check.

Where do I go for the assessment?

The assessment takes place at the Center for Communication Sciences & Disorders

Who do I contact for more information?

Megan Mahowald, Ph.D. CCC-SLP is an associate professor and department chair in Speech, Hearing and Rehabilitation Services. She is the director/primary speech-language pathologist of this assessment clinic. Dr. Mahowald has a doctorate in Literacy Education and is credentialed as a speech-language pathologist. She has been completing assessments and intervention for oral and written language at Minnesota State University for six years as well as in consultation with private clinics.

Contact information:
Email: megan.mahowald@mnsu.edu
Phone: 507-389-1415
Office: Clinical Sciences Building room 318

Language & Literacy Diagnostic Registration


Rec N Read

Student with Rec N Read participantsWho do I contact for more information?

Megan Mahowald, Ph.D. CCC-SLP is an associate professor and department chair in Speech, Hearing and Rehabilitation Services. She is the director/primary speech-language pathologist of this assessment clinic. Dr. Mahowald has a doctorate in Literacy Education and is credentialed as a speech-language pathologist. She has been completing assessments and intervention for oral and written language at Minnesota State University for six years as well as in consultation with private clinics.

Contact information:
Email: megan.mahowald@mnsu.edu
Phone: 507-389-1415
Office: Clinical Sciences Building room 318


Camp Maverick

Who do I contact for more information?

Megan Mahowald, Ph.D. CCC-SLP is an associate professor and department chair in Speech, Hearing and Rehabilitation Services. She is the director/primary speech-language pathologist of this assessment clinic. Dr. Mahowald has a doctorate in Literacy Education and is credentialed as a speech-language pathologist. She has been completing assessments and intervention for oral and written language at Minnesota State University for six years as well as in consultation with private clinics.

Contact information:
Email: megan.mahowald@mnsu.edu
Phone: 507-389-1415
Office: Clinical Sciences Building room 318


Social Skills Groups

What is it?

This program involves 8-12 weekly sessions that are 60-90 minutes in length and are designed for small groups of 4-6 individuals. They consist of team-building activities, direct instruction and opportunities to practice social interaction skills. Sessions are designed to help attendees gain in self-confidence, social communication, and relationship building skills. We strive to provide a positive atmosphere with a focus on fun!


Voice and Resonance

Voice disorders are a broad category of conditions that affect a person's vocal quality. A vocal disorder can result from a variety of reasons ranging from long term hoarseness to vocal fold paralysis. Depending on the cause of the voice disorder, the vocal quality can be affected temporarily or permanently. The clinic provides evaluation and treatment for voice disorders. Therapy sessions are focused around improving overall quality of voice and learning proper vocal habits.


Health Commons at Pond

Health Commons at Pond (Pond) bridges the school setting, family, and community. Those involved in this program recognize the relationships between a child and family health with a focus on health disparities and challenges linked to the community. As examples, Pond provides management of acute illnesses, immunizations, health screenings, vision-hearing-and-dental screenings, family guidance, and support, community connections, caregiving strategies, mental health, and bullying support, and education regarding school and community resources, among other services. Speech-Language Pathology assessment, diagnosis, and treatment are now available.

What speech, language, and hearing services are available?

Bloomington Public Schools, who partners with Health Commons at Pond (Pond), recognizes the needs of a diverse community and the current capacity to provide ample and needed speech-language pathology services. For children, speech-language pathologists work to prevent, assess, diagnose, and treat speech, language, language use, academic (reading and writing), as well as swallowing and feeding problems for children with disabilities.

  • Speech disorders occur when a person has difficulty producing speech sounds correctly or fluently (e.g., stuttering is a form of disfluency) or has problems with his or her voice or resonance.
  • Language delays and disorders occur when a person has trouble understanding others (receptive language) or sharing thoughts, ideas, and feelings (expressive language). One can have a spoken or written language disorder. Language disorders involve the form of language (phonology, morphology, syntax), the content of language (semantics), or the use of language (pragmatics).
  • Social communication disorders occur when a person has trouble with the social use of verbal and nonverbal communication. All individuals with autism spectrum disorder have social communication problems. These problems may include:
    • communicating for social purposes (e.g., greeting, commenting, asking questions);
    • talking in different ways to suit the listener and setting; and
    • following rules for conversation and storytelling
  • Academic (reading and writing) problems include organizing thoughts, remembering, planning, or problem-solving. A speech-language pathologist can test speech, language, and literacy skills and find ways to help you or your child improve. A speech-language pathologist can also work with your child' teacher to make it easier for him or her to learn in school.
  • Feeding and swallowing difficulties may follow a problem with birth or in infancy, surgery, stroke, or injury.
  • Children with severe expressive or language comprehension disorders, such as autism spectrum disorder or progressive neurological disorders often need specialized augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems to communicate with peers, teachers, family, and members of the community.

As we continue to develop our services, we will be able to offer more extensive services in audiology (hearing screenings, full hearing evaluations, and perhaps aural rehabilitation for children who are deaf or hard of hearing.

When are speech-language services available?

Speech-Language services are available on Fridays from 9:00 am to 3:30 pm by appointment. Graduate clinicians from the Communication Science and Disorders program of Minnesota State University, Mankato, take part in this service project to develop and refine their clinical skills.

How does the addition of these services benefit the community?

Nursing staff from the Glen Taylor Nursing Institute for Family and Society developed and support programs at the Pond in recognition of the relationships between a child and family health with a focus on health disparities and challenges linked to the community. Speech, language, and hearing health is an essential part of this child-family-school-neighborhood-community equation. Having adequate speech and language skills in children under three years of age, for instance, is the number one predictor of academic success in school-aged children. Community-based speech-language therapy services can help children develop essential skills for academic success.

How does Pond benefit from expanded services?

According to the World Health Organization, interprofessional collaboration in health settings leads to increased healthcare outcomes for patients, healthcare workers, and health systems. It is the department' goal to forge a collaborative and interprofessional relationship at the Pond to reinforce the positive, overall health outcomes for the children and families it serves. Additionally, the offered services support the efforts of speech-language pathologists and audiologists in Bloomington Public Schools.

How was the Glen Taylor Nursing Institute involved in the expansion of services?

The mission of The Glen Taylor Nursing Institute for Family and Society focusses on innovative nursing practice knowledge. This focus influences the health and healing of families and society. It also allows highly skilled practitioners to lead in family and society health related issues. Speech-language services at the Health Commons at Pond adds to this mission. It helps the family, child-health and functioning. It also supports the local community by harboring leadership, interprofessional collaboration, and clinical education.

Who do I contact for more information?

Dr. Eric Strong is an Assistant Professor and Clinical Supervisor. He is a former clinical pediatric and school's speech-language pathologist. Dr. Strong earned his Ph.D. and Master of Science degree from Utah State University. His areas of expertise and experience include bilingual-culturally-diverse services, stuttering, autism spectrum disorder, phonological and apraxia disorders, traumatic pediatric brain injury, and fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Dr. Strong' passion is to support community and public agencies in a collaborative, interprofessional manner.

Contact information:
Email: william.strong@mnsu.edu
Phone: 507-389-1476
Office: Clinical Sciences Building room 322
Pond availability: Fridays from 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

How do I refer my child for services?

History/Referral Form


Mankato Chapter of the National Stuttering Association

The Mankato Chapter of the National Stuttering Association (NSA) supports adults who stutter. The Mankato chapter provides an important opportunity for people who stutter to come together with others to share their experiences. Members can discuss situations they face at work or with friends, different therapy approaches, various ways of getting the most out of their lives even though they stutter and have a chance to socialize in a welcoming environment.

Many speech-language pathologists encourage their clients to take part in NSA local chapter meetings during therapy. Attending NSA meetings after exiting therapy supports long-term maintenance of treatment gains.

Clinicians are welcome to join their clients at the Mankato NSA support group meetings, or to just attend on their own. The Mankato NSA meetings are not an opportunity for clinicians to advertise their services or promote a way of thinking (the NSA does not promote or endorse any one therapy over any other), instead the Mankato Chapter of the NSA promotes learning from one another. Dr. Strong believes the best way for clinicians and people who stutter to learn from one another is to come together in the spirit of community and support.

Who do I contact for more information?

Dr. Eric Strong is an Assistant Professor and Clinical Supervisor. He is also a person who stutters and has experienced the fear and anxiety that comes with engaging others. He is a former clinical pediatric and school's speech-language pathologist. Dr. Strong earned his Ph.D. and Master of Science degree from Utah State University. His areas of expertise and experience include stuttering, autism spectrum disorder, phonological and apraxia disorders, traumatic pediatric brain injury, fetal alcohol spectrum disorder, and bilingual-culturally diverse populations. Dr. Strong' passion is to support community and public agencies in a collaborative, interprofessional manner.

Contact information:
Email: william.strong@mnsu.edu
Phone: 507-389-1476
Office: Clinical Sciences Building room 322


MSU, Mankato Aphasia Conversational Group

What is it?

Aphasia Conversational Group participantsThis is a 12-week group for adults ages 18+ with aphasia is designed to create natural conversation and interaction experiences with support in Mankato, Minnesota.  The group is facilitated by a Speech-Language Pathologist with a Certificate of Clinical Competence from the America Speech and Hearing Association in conjunction with a group of trained Speech-Language Pathology graduate students (1 student per group participant). The group is based on the Life Participation Approach to Aphasia and supported conversation.

What does group look like?

  • Aphasia Conversational Group participants with TC BearEach week a theme or topic is chosen for the group, such as: music, sports, seasons, holidays, etc.
  • Group participants discuss their preferred topics through a semi-structured question and answer format.
  • Group participants are provided supported conversation strategies that are individualized to the participant and may include: spoken and written keywords, body language and gestures, hand drawings, detailed photographs, etc., to enhance their ability to participate in the group. Everyone can participate regardless of their means of communication.
  • Number of participants in the group depends on attendance but is usually limited to no more than 10 to provide more opportunities for interactions. Each participant is assigned a single graduate student trained on that individual's means of communication. Students provide supported conversation strategies throughout the session.

What are the goals for the group?

  • Aphasia Conversational Group participantsTo provide an opportunity to make connections with other people with aphasia and to communicate with peers when given structure and support.
  • To develop friendships inside and possible outside the group setting.
  • To learn communication strategies and ways of coping with concerns related to aphasia.
  • To practice successful communication strategies in a 'safe' setting and to observe successful strategies used by others.
  • To gain confidence in the individuals own communication and to increase participation in the community.
  • To increase your sense of belonging to promote self-acceptance through knowing you are not alone.
  • To learn about other social opportunities or events in or around the community, such as Strike Out for Stroke (presented in May during Stroke Awareness Month in partnership with the Minnesota Twins baseball team.  The event honors stroke survivors and provides education and resources.)

Who do I contact for more information?

Aphasia Conversational Group participantsBonnie Berglund, M.S. CCC-SLP is Clinical Instructor in Speech, Hearing and Rehabilitation Services. She is the director/primary speech-language pathologist of the Aphasia Support Group. Bonnie has a master's in Speech-Language Pathology, is licensed in the state of Minnesota, and with the American Speech-Language Hearing Association.

Contact information:
Email: bonnie.berglund@mnsu.edu
Phone: 507-389-6298
Office: Clinical Sciences Building room 118

Aphasia Support Group Registration


Spasmodic Dysphonia Support Group

The Mankato Area Spasmodic Dysphonia Group was established in 2006.  Spasmodic Dysphonia (SD) is a neurological voice disorder that makes speaking difficult.  For individuals with this condition, the voice is difficult to use because of spasms or severe tremors that interfere with normal voice production.

The Mankato area group is affiliated with the National Spasmodic Dysphonia Association (NSDA).  The function of the group is multifaceted; it provides educational updates about SD to its members, increases public awareness about the condition, helps educate students who are seeking a career in speech therapy, and it provides support and socialization for its members. 

 The group meets quarterly at the Center for Communication Sciences and Disorders on the campus of Minnesota State University, Mankato.  For members who live a longer distance from Mankato, there is an option to attend the meetings using online software. 

If you wish to contact the group, please contact one of the following individuals:

Steve Jaeger, Group Liaison to the National Spasmodic Dysphonia Association (NSDA)

sjaeger@blc.edu

Bruce J. Poburka, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, Group Coordinator

bruce.poburka@mnsu.edu

(507) 389-5843


Motor Speech and Articulation


Minnesota Connect Aphasia Now (MnCAN) Aphasia Conversation Group in MSU, Mankato Edina Campus

What is it?

This is a 12-week group for adults ages 18+ with aphasia is designed to create natural conversation and interaction experiences with support in the metro area in Minnesota.  The group is facilitated by Dr. Sheen Chiou, Speech-Language Pathologist with a Certificate of Clinical Competence from the America Speech and Hearing Association in conjunction with a group of trained Speech-Language Pathology graduate students. The group is based on the Life Participation Approach to Aphasia and supported conversation.

What does group look like?

  • Group participants discuss their preferred topics through a semi-structured question and answer format.
  • Group participants are provided supported conversation strategies that are individualized to the participant and may include: spoken and written keywords, body language and gestures, hand drawings, detailed photographs, etc., to enhance their ability to participate in the group. Everyone can participate regardless of their means of communication.
  • Participant is assigned graduate students trained on that individual's means of communication. Students provide supported conversation strategies throughout the session.

Minnesota Connect Aphasia Now Conversation Group participants

Minnesota Connect Aphasia Now Conversation Group participants

Aphasia conversation groups

Who do I contact for more information?

H. Sheen Chiou, Ph.D. CCC-SLP is a professor in Speech, Hearing and Rehabilitation Services. Dr. Chiou' expertise is adult language and cognitive disorders. Dr. Chiou is a bilingual speech-language pathologist and provides assessment and intervention services for individuals with brain injury (e.g., stroke, traumatic brain injury, neurodegenerative disorders). Dr. Chiou created community-based dementia programs and co-founded Garden EngAGEment through interprofessional collaboration.

Contact information:
Email: hsinhuei.chiou@mnsu.edu
Phone: 507-389-5840
Office: Clinical Sciences Building room 321


Audiology Services

Provides comprehensive hearing assessments and screenings as well as testing for central auditory processing disorders. The Center for Communication Sciences & Disorders provides comprehensive hearing evaluations and aural rehabilitation services across all age groups. In addition to identifying the presence or absence of a peripheral hearing loss, the Center is equipped to evaluate central auditory processing skills in children. A child exhibiting central auditory processing problems will often experience greater difficulty attending to, discriminating, recognizing, or comprehending speech information presented to the auditory system, even though the child has normal intelligence and hearing sensitivity.

All audiological testing is supervised by a licensed audiologist. Services are provided to individuals without regard to age, race, color, sex, national origin or religion, handicapped or veteran status. Concerns regarding clinical services should be directed to Dr. Karen Brennhofer, our licensed Audiologist karen.brennhofer@mnsu.edu or the Clinic Director Kate Glogowski, M.A. CCC-SLP Katherine.glogowski@mnsu.edu